27-31 August 2018
LVH, Luisenstraße 58, 10117 Berlin
Europe/Berlin timezone
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Galactic Science

Place

Location: LVH, Luisenstraße 58, 10117 Berlin
Address: LANGENBECK VIRCHOW HAUS Luisenstraße 58, 10117 Berlin
Date: from 27 Aug 14:00 to 31 Aug 15:45

Description

Chair: Jacco Vink

Conveners

  • 27 Aug 14:00 - 3:45 PM 1
    • Mr. Khangulyan, Dmitry (Rikkyo University)
    • Dr. Tibaldo, Luigi (IRAP)
    • de Ona Wilhelmi, Emma (CSIC-IEEC)
  • 29 Aug 14:00 - 3:45 PM 2
    • Mr. Khangulyan, Dmitry (Rikkyo University)
    • Dr. Tibaldo, Luigi (IRAP)
    • de Ona Wilhelmi, Emma (CSIC-IEEC)
  • 31 Aug 14:00 - 3:45 PM 3
    • Mr. Khangulyan, Dmitry (Rikkyo University)
    • Dr. Tibaldo, Luigi (IRAP)
    • de Ona Wilhelmi, Emma (CSIC-IEEC)

Timetable | Contribution List

Displaying 16 contributions out of 16
Type: Talk Session: Galactic Science
Track: Galactic
PWN make up the majority of the identified galactic TeV sources and are a key ingredient to understand the high energy sky. In this contribution, I will review recent progress in magnetohydrodynamic and particle transport modeling of PWN, highlighting advances with fully three-dimensional global models. It is now clear that the MHD kink- and Kelvin Helmholtz-type instabilities lead to turbulent fl ... More
Presented by Dr. Oliver PORTH on 31/8/2018 at 12:00
Type: Talk Session: Galactic Science
Track: Gamma-rays
PSR J2032+4127 is a young gamma-ray pulsar located in the same direction as the extended TeV gamma-ray source TeV J2032+4130. The pulsar has recently been discovered to be in a 45-50 year period, highly eccentric binary orbit with the Be star MT91 213. Periastron occurred in November 2017 and over this period an intense observational campaign was conducted by the TeV gamma-ray telescope arrays VER ... More
Presented by Dr. Ralph BIRD on 31/8/2018 at 13:00
Type: Talk Session: Galactic Science
Track: Galactic
Progress in observation and theory allows to study Galactic sources of Cosmic Rays in ever increasing numbers, variety and phenomenological complexity. We are presently witnessing the complement of deep studies of individual sources by population aspects, and Galactic source physics reaching out into the extragalactic domain. Some source classes presently evade generalization owing to uniqueness ( ... More
Presented by Olaf REIMER on 27/8/2018 at 12:00
Type: Talk Session: Galactic Science
Track: Galactic
Star formation in galaxies appears to be self-regulated by energetic feedback processes. Among the most promising agents of feedback are cosmic rays (CRs), the relativistic ion population of interstellar and intergalactic plasmas. In these environments, energetic CRs are virtually collisionless and interact via collective phenomena mediated by kinetic-scale plasma waves and large-scale magnetic fi ... More
Presented by Prof. Christoph PFROMMER on 29/8/2018 at 12:30
Type: Talk Session: Galactic Science
Track: Galactic
HESS J1826$-$130 is an unidentified very-high-energy (VHE, E>0.1 TeV) gamma-ray source discovered by H.E.S.S. along the Galactic plane. The analysis of 215-hour H.E.S.S. data has revealed a steady TeV source with an extension of 0.21°. The source spectrum can be well described with a power-law function, showing a very hard spectral index of $\Gamma$ = 1.8 and an exponential cut-off at ~15 TeV. Th ... More
Presented by Dr. Ekrem Oguzhan ANGÜNER on 27/8/2018 at 13:30
Type: Talk Session: Galactic Science
Track: Galactic
Massive Star clusters and Super bubbles in star forming regions (SFRs) have been postulated as possible sources of cosmic rays in our galaxy. At the interaction sites of stellar winds of O type stars, charged particles can be accelerated to TeV energies. One possible example of this is a Fermi-LAT cocoon, an extended region of gamma-ray emission detected by Fermi-LAT and attributed to a cocoon of ... More
Presented by Binita HONA on 29/8/2018 at 13:00
Type: Talk Session: Galactic Science
Track: Galactic
Shocks of stellar winds and supernova remnants (SNRs) can accelerate particles to energies of 100 TeV or higher and are thus believed to be sources of Galactic cosmic rays. Multi-frequency studies of SNRs and superbubbles from radio to X-rays help to understand the propagation of shock waves and their interaction with the ambient medium, while combining the study of interstellar shocks w ... More
Presented by Manami SASAKI on 27/8/2018 at 12:30
Type: Talk Session: Galactic Science
Track: Galactic
The shock waves at supernova remnants (SNRs) are the prominent acceleration sites of Galactic cosmic rays. The diffusion of the accelerated particles around the SNR shock is assumed to be Bohm type, where the diffusion coefficient is proportional to the particle energy. The details, however, remain unrevealed. There is a method to diagnose the diffusion coefficient from the cutoff shape of the ... More
Presented by Naomi TSUJI on 29/8/2018 at 13:15
Type: Talk Session: Galactic Science
Track: Galactic
We present follow-up X-ray and gamma-ray observations of two unidentified Galactic HAWC sources, 2HWC J1928+177 and 2HWC J1953+294, with the NuSTAR and VERITAS observatories. VERITAS gamma-ray observations of 2HWC J1928+177 resulted in upper limits, while a follow-up NuSTAR X-ray observation detected a variable X-ray point source with a bright IR counterpart. The HAWC source could be powered by t ... More
Presented by Dr. Kaya MORI on 27/8/2018 at 13:15
Type: Talk Session: Galactic Science
Track: Gamma-rays
SNR G24.7+0.6 is a 9.5 kyrs radio and GeV gamma-ray supernova remnant (SNR) evolving in a dense medium. In the GeV regime, SNR G24.7+0.5 shows a hard spectral index which which if extended to very high energies should be easily detected by current Cherenkov telescopes. We observed the field of view of SNR G24.7+0.6 with the MAGIC telescopes. The region shows a complex environment, displaying diffe ... More
Presented by Emma DE ONA WILHELMI on 31/8/2018 at 13:30
Type: Talk Session: Galactic Science
Track: Galactic
I will review the current state of the art in available data and emission models of binary systems at high- (0.1-100GeV) and very-high-energy (>100GeV) gamma rays. The majority among these systems consists of an early type star with a strong stellar wind and a compact companion. Commonly accepted models assume that the compact object is a pulsar having a pulsar wind driven by the pulsar's spin-do ... More
Presented by Daniela HADASCH on 31/8/2018 at 12:30
Type: Talk Session: Galactic Science
Track: Galactic
The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) gamma-ray observatory has been fully operational since March 2015 in central Mexico. Using $\sim$3 years of HAWC data and recently developed energy estimation techniques, now it is possible to study the highest energy sources with their energy-dependent morphology. The unidentified VER J2019+368 is among the highest energy sources and shows significant emi ... More
Presented by Mr. Vikas JOSHI on 31/8/2018 at 13:15
Type: Talk Session: Galactic Science
Track: Galactic
Supernova remnant (SNR) N132D, located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, represents a unique opportunity for the study of gamma-ray emission from shock-accelerated cosmic rays (CRs) in another galaxy since it stands as the first and only extra-galactic SNR detected in gamma-rays. N132D is one of the brightest SNRs in the local Universe in the X-ray, infrared and radio bands, and it has also been dete ... More
Presented by Dr. Daniel CASTRO on 29/8/2018 at 13:30
Type: Talk Session: Galactic Science
Track: Galactic
Using archival data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope in the 0.1 - 300$\,$GeV photon energy range, we detect and characterise the gamma-ray emission counterpart on parsec scales to the optically translucent, infrared-emitting and dominantly neutral "Cirrus" clouds, which carry the bulk of gas mass in the disk of the Milky Way at the solar circle. The detection is achieved using a stacking a ... More
Presented by Dr. Richard TUFFS on 29/8/2018 at 12:45
Type: Talk Session: Galactic Science
Track: Galactic
The H.E.S.S. Galactic Plane Survey (HGPS) provides the most comprehensive view to date of the inner Milky Way in TeV gamma-rays. Of the sources detected, 40% can be firmly identified, mostly as pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) or supernova remnants (SNRs). The uniform analysis of the HGPS allows systematic studies of the populations of these two classes of TeV-emitting objects. The population of ... More
Presented by Dr. Yves GALLANT on 27/8/2018 at 13:00
Type: Talk Session: Galactic Science
Track: Galactic
During the last two decades due to the increase of computing power and software developments, such as adaptive mesh refinement, substantial progress has been made in numerical modeling of the interstellar medium (ISM). It has been found that the bulk of kinetic and thermal energy input stems from supernovae and to a lesser extent from stellar winds. Our group has shown that on mesoscales (1 kpc x ... More
Presented by Dieter BREITSCHWERDT on 29/8/2018 at 12:00
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