12-23 July 2021
Online
Europe/Berlin timezone

Parker Solar Probe’s Measurements of the November 29, 2020 Large Solar Energetic Particle Event

12 Jul 2021, 18:00
1h 30m
07

07

Talk SH | Solar & Heliospheric Discussion

Speaker

Christina Cohen (Caltech)

Description

On November 29, 2020 active region 12790 was located just beyond the east limb of the Sun as viewed by Earth. It erupted at 12:34UT with an M4.4 flare (as measured by GOES) and launched a coronal mass ejection (CME) traveling ~1700 km/s. Not surprisingly, this fast CME drove a shock that accelerated particles up to tens of MeV/nuc. More unusual was that these solar energetic particles (SEPs) quickly filled the inner heliosphere and the event was observed by spacecraft distributed around the Sun, including Parker Solar Probe (PSP), STEREO-A, Solar Orbiter, and those near Earth such as ACE and SOHO. This was the first large SEP event detected by the Integrated Science Investigation of the Sun (ISʘIS) suite on PSP and its first opportunity to make measurements of heavy ion spectra up to tens of MeV/nuc. Here we present an overview of event characteristics as determined by ISʘIS, including H, He, O, and Fe spectra, composition as a function of energy, and temporal variations of the energetic particle intensities throughout the event.

Keywords

Solar energetic particles; particle acceleration; particle transport

Subcategory Experimental Results

Primary authors

E.R. Christian (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771) Christina Cohen (Caltech) A.C. Cummings (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125) A.J. Davis (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125) M.I. Desai (University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249) G.A. de Nolfo (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771) J. Giacalone (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721) M.E. Hill (Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723) C.J. Joyce (Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544) A.W. Labrador (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125) R.A. Leske (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125) W.H. Matthaeus (University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716) D.J. McComas (Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544) R.L. McNutt Jr. (Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723) R.A. Mewaldt (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125) D.G. Mitchell (Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723) J.G. Mitchell (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 & Department of Physics, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052) J.S. Rankin (Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544) E.C. Roelof (Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723) N.A. Schwadron (University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824) E.C. Stone (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125) J.R. Szalay (Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544) M.E. Wiedenbeck (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109) A. Vourlidas (Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723) S.D. Bale (Physics Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720) M. Pulupa (Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720) R.J. MacDowall (Solar System Exploration Division, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771)

Presentation Materials

There are no materials yet.