6th Beam Telescopes and Test Beams Workshop 2018

Europe/Berlin
ETH HG E 1.2 (Zurich, Switzerland)

ETH HG E 1.2

Zurich, Switzerland

Rämistrasse 101, 8092 Zürich, Schweiz
Christopher Betancourt (University of Zurich) , Clara Nellist (LAL - Orsay) , Davide Reggiani (Paul Scherrer Institut) , Hendrik Jansen (DESY) , Jan Dreyling-Eschweiler (DESY) , Joern Lange (IFAE Barcelona) , Malte Backhaus (ETH Zurich) , Maren Tabea Meinhard (ETHZ) , Michael Reichmann (ETH Zuerich) , Simon Corrodi (ETH Zurich) , Simon Spannagel (DESY - CMS)
Description

This workshop will cover a wide range of topics related to test beams for detector studies in tracking detectors, calorimetry and beyond. It aims at bringing together both experts and newcomers from various fields. There will be a combination of presentations by experienced users, results from recent test beam studies and tutorials to teach the software required to analyse the results. Please have a look at the last three events to get a more detailed impression of the workshop's content: BTTB5 in Barcelona in 2017, BTTB4 in Orsay in 2016 or BTTB3 in Hamburg in 2015.

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Abstracts

In order to apply for a talk, please submit an abstract using the "Submit a new abstract" button below. The decision on acceptance will be communicated shortly after the abstract submission deadline.

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Paper
Slides
Participants
  • Alexander Daetwyler
  • Alexander Gerbershagen
  • Anastasiia Velyka
  • Andre Rummler
  • Andreas Nürnberg
  • Blake Dean Leverington
  • Blerina Gkotse
  • Caroline Niemeyer
  • Carsten Grzesik
  • Christopher Betancourt
  • Clara Nellist
  • Claudio Di Giulio
  • Daniele Ruini
  • David Barney
  • David Cooke
  • David Cussans
  • Davide Reggiani
  • Dennis Proft
  • Depero Emilio
  • Diego Alejandro Sanz Becerra
  • Dimitris Varouchas
  • Dmytro Hohov
  • Dominik Dannheim
  • Douglas Schaefer
  • Edoardo Rossi
  • Enrico Junior Schioppa
  • Eraldo Oliveri
  • Fabian Hügging
  • Fabrizio Salvatore
  • Federico Ravotti
  • Finn Feindt
  • Florian Brunbauer
  • Florian Dachs
  • Francisco Jose Iguaz Gutierrez
  • Giovanna Lehmann Miotto
  • Giulia Giannini
  • Hendrik Jansen
  • Henric Wilkens
  • Isidre Mateu
  • Jan Dreyling-Eschweiler
  • Jan-Hendrik Arling
  • Jens Weingarten
  • Jiri Kroll
  • Joern Lange
  • Kritsada Kittimanapun
  • Lennart Huth
  • Lorenzo Sestini
  • Lorenzo Uplegger
  • Lukas Gerritzen
  • Maarten van Dijk
  • Malte Backhaus
  • Mareike Weers
  • Maren Tabea Meinhard
  • Marisol Robles Manzano
  • Markus Joos
  • Martin van Beuzekom
  • Mateus Vicente
  • Mathieu Benoit
  • Mengqing WU
  • Michael Reichmann
  • Michaela Queitsch-Maitland
  • Michal KOZIEL
  • Morag Williams
  • Moritz Kiehn
  • Moritz Wiehe
  • Nicola Minafra
  • Nikkie Deelen
  • Olivier Girard
  • Petra Riedler
  • Ralf Diener
  • Remi Ete
  • Riccardo Del Burgo
  • Riccardo Farinelli
  • Sarah Aretz
  • Simon Corrodi
  • Simon Spannagel
  • Sohail AMJAD
  • Spyridon Argyropoulos
  • Stefan Ritt
  • Stefano Mersi
  • Styliani Orfanelli
  • Tamar Zakareishvili
  • Thomas Eichhorn
  • Tiina Naaranoja
  • Tom Coates
  • Vincenzo Monaco
  • Xiaocong Ai
  • Yannick Dieter
  • Zhijun Liang
    • 09:00 12:00
      Satellite meetings
      Conveners: Dr Federico Ravotti (CERN) , Matthew Wing (UCL)
      • 09:00
        AIDA 2020 WP5 3h

        https://indico.cern.ch/event/690846/

      • 09:30
        AIDA 2020 WP15 2h 30m

        https://indico.cern.ch/event/683891/

    • 12:15 12:45
      Registration
    • 12:45 13:00
      Welcome
      • 12:45
        Welcome to Zurich 10m
        Speaker: Rainer Wallny (ETH Zurich)
        Slides
      • 12:55
        Workshop Information 5m
        Speaker: Jan Dreyling-Eschweiler (DESY)
        Slides
    • 13:00 14:30
      Overview lectures
      Convener: Dr Malte Backhaus (ETH Zurich)
      • 13:00
        Data acquisition for continuous readout and triggered experiments 45m
        Data AcQuisition (DAQ) is a very vague term that in high energy physics is associated to the readout, event building and storage of the physics data, as well as the control, configuration and monitoring of the data taking operations. Though the main functional blocks of DAQ systems remain always the same (readout, event building, storage, control, configuration, monitoring), their design and implementation may vary widely. A DAQ system may consist of a single device for a small laboratory setup or encompass tens of thousands of interconnected devices for large experiments such as at the LHC. Besides size and complexity of the experiment, two other elements characterise the DAQ systems: - how the front-end electronics sends out data (continuous mode or triggered) - whether all the experiment’s components are synchronised through a unique timing distribution system. After a brief introduction to DAQ, this talk will focus on the differences between continuous readout and triggered DAQ systems and on how those can lead to very different definitions of a “physics event”.
        Speaker: Dr Giovanna Lehmann Miotto (CERN)
        Slides
      • 13:45
        Overview on Timing Detectors 45m
        Detection systems with fast and precise timing are intensely part of ongoing and future detector R&D for the unique measurements and selection condition that they can offer to experiments and applications. Each specific case requires specific timing precision together with other distinct requirements. A few examples are radiation hardness, rate capabilities, granularity and large area coverage. In this wide and varied context of requests, different technologies and detection systems are proposed. High precision timing requires a strong interplay between sensor, readout electronics and signal processing. Every single part will play an important role in the results and common aspects are present between the different technologies. The aim of the talk is to overview ongoing developments on different sensor technologies targeting tens of picoseconds of time resolution. Principles and methods behind timing measurements and detector response characterization will be discussed, using examples coming from the ongoing R&D activities. Particular emphasis will be given to beam studies and hardware setup.
        Speaker: Eraldo Oliveri (CERN)
        Slides
    • 14:30 15:00
      Coffe break 30m
    • 15:00 16:30
      Overview lectures
      Convener: Dr Malte Backhaus (ETH Zurich)
      • 15:00
        Challenges of testbeam facilities for HL-LHC/CLIC/ILC calorimetry 45m
        Calorimetry in high-energy physics is rapidly evolving, with new specifications (e.g. higher energies, enormous particle densities) and a wide variety of technologies, both for signal creation and detection. Despite excellent advances in Monte-Carlo simulations for predicting the behaviour of novel detectors in extreme conditions, beam tests of prototypes is still a mandatory part of the development process. But the demands on testbeam facilities to be able to test these prototypes are becoming more and more difficult to achieve. We discuss some of the cutting-edge calorimeters being developed for HL-LHC and CLIC/ILC, and review the pros and cons of various worldwide testbeam facilities for evaluating prototypes.
        Speaker: Dr David Barney (CERN)
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Monolithic Silicon Pixel Detectors in HEP 45m
        Silicon pixel detectors are used as inner tracking detectors in many High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments providing precise tracking information in the regions close to the interaction point. While most present systems are based on hybrid silicon pixel detectors, the development of monolithic silicon pixel detectors has made significant progress in recent years. This talk will provide an overview of the various developments for monolithic silicon pixel detectors. Furthermore, possible developments that will allow to include monolithic pixel detectors in high radiation environments will be discussed.
        Speaker: Dr Petra Riedler (CERN)
        Slides
    • 16:30 17:00
      Coffee break 30m
    • 17:00 19:00
      Facilities & Infrastructure
      Convener: Dr Davide Reggiani (Paul Scherrer Institut)
      • 17:00
        Doubling the Frascati INFN Beam Test Facility (BTF) 20m
        The BTF of the DAΦNE accelerator complex, in the Frascati National Laboratory of the INFN, is in operation since 2004 with an average of 200 beam-days and 25 groups/year. The doubling of the beam-line will allow increasing the access capability, as well as hosting long-term experiments in parallel with the test-beam activities. The activities ongoing for the upgrade of the facility are described
        Speaker: Dr Claudio Di Giulio (INFN-LNF)
        Slides
      • 17:20
        The DESY II Testbeam Facility 20m
        The DESY II Test Beam Facility will resume operations mid February 2018. The current status and possibilities for future improvements and extensions of the facility will be presented.
        Speaker: Ralf Diener (DESY)
        Slides
      • 17:40
        A New Detector Test Beamline at ELSA 20m
        The ELSA facility at Bonn University offers a primary electron beam for two hadron physics experiments and detector test applications. The beam is extracted from a 0.5 to 3.2 GeV storage ring with an energy deviation smaller than 0.1 percent. A dedicated detector test beamline has started operation in mid 2016 and has so far served the local high-energy physics research group in several irradiation sessions. At the hadron physics experimental sites a tagged photon beam is available. Electron extraction rates range from 1 Hz to 1 GHz, the beam size is adjustable from 1 to 10 mm in both transverse planes. Beam parameters such as energy, extraction rate, beam size and divergence can be easily changed during dedicated beam times. The current status, the test site's infrastructure and the gained experience with the beamline will be presented.
        Speaker: Mr Dennis Proft (University of Bonn)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        High rate electron beam tests with MuPix sensors at MAMI 20m
        The Mainz Microtron (MAMI) is an electron accelerator at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Mainz, that provides beam energies of up to 1.6 GeV. With its narrow beam profile, continous stream of particles and beam currents of up to 100 µA it can be used for multiple test beam applications. One of these is testing detectors at very high rates. Another one is using the possibility of MAMI to produce high energy, tagged photons to test the response to photons. Both tests have been conducted with HV-MAPS (High Voltage Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors), that are foreseen to be used in the Mu3e experiment at PSI and the P2 experiment in Mainz. In this talk the MAMI facility and recent results of MuPix testing at hit rates of up to 2 MHz are presented.
        Speaker: Mr Carsten Grzesik (KPH Mainz)
        Slides
      • 18:20
        LEMMA (Low EMittance Muon Accelerator) 2017 CERN test beam results 20m
        In order to further consolidate the present kwnoledge of the Standard Model and to look for deviations from its predictions that would signal new physics effects a new generation of hadron hadron or electron position colliders is often put forward. However also the idea of a muon collider seems to be attractive because such a machine would provide the high centre of mass energy typical of a hadron hadron machine in the clean experimental environement typical of an electron position machine. Hence the muon collider can serve as a Higgs factory, can explore the multi-TeV frontier and can be used to investigate rare muon processes, including any process related to lepton universality violation in the muon sector. Clearly the muon collider has to face quite a few challenges. One of these is the production of a low emittance muon / antimuon beam to be feed into a suitable accelerator complex. Recently the idea of getting such muons / antimuons from collisions of an about 45 GeV low emittance positrons beam on fixed target has been put forward. The 45 GeV incident positron energy is chosen because it corresponds to the energy threshold of the process e+ e- -> mu+ mu- which, at threshold, should give the wanted muon / antimuon low emittance particles flux. The experimental proof of this expectation is the goal of the Low EMittance Muon Accelerator (LEMMA) collaboration who carried out in Summer 2017 a dedicated test beam at the CERN H4 experimental area. The test beam was based on a silicon telescope setup complemented by a dipole magnetic field, a muon chamber and a set of calorimeters, to tag electrons / positrons. The ultimate goal of the LEMMA collaboration is the measurement of the emittance of the produced muon / antimuon particles flux and of the corresponding cross section at threshold. The concepts and the experimental setup used in Summer 2017 will be presented together with a summary of the results of the test beam.
        Speaker: Dr sestini lorenzo (INFN)
        Slides
      • 18:40
        The Fermilab Test Beam Facility 20m
        The Fermilab Test Beam Facility is a world class facility for testing and characterizing particle detectors. The facility has been in operation since 2005 and has undergone significant upgrades in the last two years. With two operational beam lines, the facility can deliver a variety of particle types and momenta ranging from 120 GeV protons in the primary beam line down to 200 MeV particles in the tertiary beam line. In addition, recent work has focused on analyzing the beam structure to provide users with information on the data they are collecting. A new DAQ system has been developed and will be discussed in this talk.
        Speaker: Lorenzo Uplegger (Fermilab)
        Slides
    • 19:00 21:00
      Welcome reception 2h
    • 09:00 10:35
      Facilities & Infrastructure
      Convener: Dr Henric Wilkens (CERN)
      • 09:00
        Current and planned upgrades of the IRRAD and GIF++ irradiation facilities at CERN 20m
        The upcoming High-Luminosity upgrade of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) and the R&D on future accelerators (FCC) requires radiation hardness tests and qualification of tracking and calorimetry detectors. Two reference facilities for irradiation tests at CERN are the Proton Irradiation Facility (IRRAD) and the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++). The IRRAD facility, located in the East Area of the Proton Synchrotron (PS) accelerator, receives a 24GeV/c proton beam from the PS for the irradiation experiments and it is mainly used for the characterisation of inner detector components. The GIF++, located in the North Area of Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), is a unique facility, which combines a µ-beam from the H4 beam line and a 137Cs of 14 TBq in order to provide a radiation field suitable for the qualification of gas detectors of HEP experiments. Both facilities have several equipment and complex control and data management systems, which have been implemented and improved within EU-funded projects (AIDA-2020). In this talk, these facilities will be presented and their current operation and planned upgrades will be described in detail. In addition, this presentation will include an overview of the most commonly used irradiation facilities for particle detectors and electronic components testing. Some practical recommendations and best practices about the organization of irradiation test campaigns will be provided. Finally, an update about the new CERN Irradiation Facilities database including information about the characteristics and locations of worldwide available facilities, developed one year ago within the EU-funded project AIDA-2020, will be presented.
        Speaker: Ms Blerina Gkotse (CERN)
        Slides
      • 09:20
        The PSI HIPA Beam Lines 15m
        This contribution will give an overview of the secondary beam lines of the PSI High Intensity Proton Accelerator (HIPA). Particular emphasis will be given to those facilities currently available for tests.
        Speaker: Davide Reggiani
        Slides
      • 09:35
        The CERN East Area 20m
        The East Area at the Proton Synchrotron is one of CERN’s longest running facilities for experiments, beam tests, and irradiations with a history of 55 years. An overview of the available facilities will be given: two beam lines providing secondary hadron or electron beams in the momentum spectrum of 0.5-12 GeV/c complementing the momentum range of the SPS north area, as well as the CHARM and IRRAD irradiation facilities. To continue meeting the high demand for beam time, the CERN council has approved the East Area Renovation Project, aiming to maintain and upgrade the existing facilities. The project timeline expands currently over LS2 (2019-2020), and details of the future layout and characteristics are presented in this talk. Additionally, since autumn 2016, the AIDA beam telescope AZALEA has been permanently installed in East Area beam lines and is available for the users. Measurements taken with this telescope in the T9 and T10 beam lines, demonstrating the performance of the detector planes in several beam conditions, are also presented.
        Speaker: Dr Maarten van Dijk (CERN)
        Slides
      • 09:55
        Overview over CERN SPS secondary beams 15m
        CERN’s accelerator complex offers a great variety of multi-purpose test-beam facilities. In this presentation, an overview of the secondary beams derived from proton beams extracted from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) will be given. The available secondary particle beam momenta range from about 10 GeV/c up to 400 GeV/c. The available intensities extend from about 10^3 up to 10^7 particles per spill. The readout of some of the beam instrumentation of the lines is also available to the user community and the beams can be optimized (within certain restrictions) to serve each experiment’s requirements. Additionally to the overview over the secondary beamlines, several experiments, such as HiRadMat and AWAKE, are discussed in the current presentation. Also, the plans for the consolidation of the North Area hall are presented.
        Speaker: Dr Alexander Gerbershagen (CERN)
        Slides
      • 10:10
        The “Beamline for Schools” competition at CERN 20m
        In 2014 CERN has started to organize “Beamline for Schools” (BL4S), an annual physics competition for high-school students aged 16 and up. In the competition, teams of students from all around the world are invited to propose an experiment to CERN that makes use of a secondary beam of particles with momenta of up to 10 GeV/c from CERN’s Proton Synchrotron (PS). The students have to describe their experiment in a document of up to 1000 words and complement their application with a one-minute video. CERN provides a number of various detectors, magnets, readout electronics and other components to the students and allows them to bring their own equipment. In the first four years of the competition, 6900 students from all around the world have participated and in total eight winning teams have been selected and invited to CERN for 12 days each. Every year, two dedicated support scientists prepare the winning experiments and operate them together with the winners. We will describe the challenges linked to the Beamline for Schools competition, focussing on the detectors and software that have been developed by the BL4S team, the technical implementation and operation of the experiments and the overall project structure. We will also report on the impact of the competition on the students. Finally, we will present an outlook for the future of the BL4S competition, taking into account the shutdown of the accelerators at CERN in 2019 and 2020.
        Speakers: Mr Markus Joos (CERN) , Ms Sarah Aretz (CERN)
        Slides
      • 10:30
        Introduction to tutorials 5m
        Speaker: Dr Jan Dreyling-Eschweiler (DESY)
        Slides
    • 10:35 11:00
      Coffee break 25m
    • 11:00 12:40
      Analysis: Timing Detectors
      Convener: Mr Joern Lange (IFAE Barcelona)
      • 11:00
        Picosec: a Micromegas based detector with a timing precision of 24 ps for 150 GeV muons 20m
        The Picosec detection concept consists in a two-stage Micromegas detector coupled to a Cerenkov radiator and equipped with a photocathode. A 1cm2 area prototype has already been built and characterized to prove this concept. A single-photoelectron response of 76 ps has been measured with a femtosecond UV laser at CEA/IRAMIS, while a time resolution of 24 ps with a mean yield of 10 photoelectrons has been measured at the CERN SPS extraction lines with MIPs. This talk will present the main results of this prototype, but it will particularly focus on the performance of the different detector configurations tested in 2016 and 2017 beam campaigns. In these tests, several types of readouts (bulk, thin bulk, resistive) and photocathodes (CsI based, pure metallic, diamond) were characterized with muons and pions. Finally, the prospects of building a Picosec detector for a running or future experiment will be discussed. In particular, the scaling strategies to a large area coverage with a multichannel readout plane, the R&D on solid converters for building a robust photocathode, the front-end electronics or the expected performance at high rate.
        Speaker: Dr Francisco Jose Iguaz Gutierrez (University of Zaragoza)
        Slides
      • 11:20
        Performance of diamond timing detectors after collecting 2.5 fb^-1 20m
        Diamond timing detectors were installed in CT-PPS Roman Pots in June 2016 and served for collecting 2.5 fb^-1 of data. During the LHC technical stop from Dec 2016 to Apr 2017 one plane of diamond detectors was removed from each detector package and replaced with Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD). This provided an opportunity to re-characterize the diamond detector performance after irradiation. The present talk discusses the results of the tests performed with a 180 GeV pion beam at the Northern Area at CERN in May 2017. The detectors were found in working condition. The typical signal height varied from 0.5 to 0.6 V, which is in the same range as typical MIP signal from a diamond sensor, but slightly lower than the non-irradiated reference detector in the same beam test. The signal-to-noise ratio was above 25. The challenges related to the comparison of the results to performance prior to the installation are also discussed.
        Speaker: Tiina Naaranoja (Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki, Finland)
        Slides
      • 11:40
        A High-Granularity Timing Detector for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS Calorimeter system: detector concept description and first beam test results 20m
        The expected increase of the particle flux at the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) with instantaneous luminosities up to L ≃ 7.5 × 1034 cm^{−2} s^{-1} will have a severe impact on the ATLAS detector performance. The pile-up is expected to increase on average to 200 interactions per bunch crossing. The reconstruction and trigger performance for electrons, photons as well as jets and transverse missing energy will be severely degraded in the end-cap and forward region, where the liquid Argon based electromagnetic calorimeter has coarser granularity compared to the central region. A High Granularity Timing Detector (HGTD) is proposed in front of the liquid Argon end-cap calorimeters for pile-up mitigation at Level-0 (L0) trigger level and in the offline reconstruction. This device should cover the pseudo-rapidity range of 2.4 to about 4.2. Four layers of Silicon sensors are foreseen to provide a precision timing information for minimum ionizing particle with a time resolution better than 50 pico-seconds per readout cell in order to assign the particle to the correct vertex. Each readout cell has a transverse size of 1.3 mm × 1.3 mm leading to a highly granular detector with more than 6 millions of readout electronics channels. Low Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGAD) technology has been chosen as it provides an internal gain good enough to reach large signal over noise ratio needed for excellent time resolution. The requirements and overall specifications of the High Granular Timing Detector at the HL-LHC will be presented as well as the conceptual design of its mechanics and electronics. Beam test results and measurements of irradiated LGAD silicon sensors, such as gain and timing resolution, will be shown.
        Speaker: Spyridon Argyropoulos (DESY)
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Test of thin Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD) for monitoring of high flux charged particle beams 20m
        Prototype beam monitoring devices are under development at the Torino section of INFN, with the goal of measuring the flux, the profile and the energy of charged particle beams, in particular for radiobiology and hadron-therapy applications. The devices will employ Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD), innovative silicon sensors optimized for timing measurements based on the Low-Gain Avalanche Diode technology (LGAD), where a controlled internal gain is obtained with an additional p++ layer implanted in a n-on-p silicon diode. The flux measurement exploits the fast collection time of thin silicon sensors (about 1 ns in 50 um), which allows to discriminate single beam particles and count their number up to high fluxes, depending on the sensor segmentation. The number of crossing particles will provide a direct measurement of the beam flux independent of the particle energy or other parameters, in contrast to measurements based, for example, on the total charge produced in a gas detector. The beam energy will be determined exploiting the timing capabilities of UFSDs, and using the time of flight information from a telescope of two silicon detectors placed at a distance of less than 1 m along the beam direction. Dedicated UFSD strip sensors with 50 um thickness have been produced at the Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) in Trento, Italy, and are currently studied in laboratory and in beam tests. The segmentation of the sensors (2 mm^2 strip area) will allow to measure beam rates up to 108 Hz/cm^2 with pile-up probability < 1 %. The sensors have been produced with different doping alternatives to study the best options in terms of radiation resistance. The enhanced Signal-to-Noise ratio of the UFSD sensors has driven the design of dedicated readout ASICs able to deal with high signal frequencies (several 10^8 Hz/channel), with two different architectures based respectively on a transimpedence amplifier and a charge sensitive amplifier. Preliminary results of tests of 50 um thick UFSD pads and strip detectors with the proton beam of the CNAO hadron-therapy center of Pavia, Italy (proton fluxes up to 5*10^9 Hz/cm^2, FWHM 1 cm) will be presented. Waveforms collected from two aligned sensors have been analyzed to evaluate their counting and timing properties. Single beam particles are well separated and the fine time structure of the beam is resolved with nanosecond resolution. The detectors have been characterized in terms of time resolution (35 ps for single crossing), counting linearity, pile-up probability, signal degradation with the accumulated radiation dose. The experience gained from the test of sensors in the difficult environment of a therapeutic beam will be shared.
        Speaker: Prof. Vincenzo Monaco (University of Torino and INFN Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, Torino, Italy)
        Slides
      • 12:20
        Single particle detection for medical applications 20m
        A Low Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD) was used to characterize a linear accelerator (LINAC) used for radiotherapy at St. Luke Hospital in Dublin. The LINAC, manufactured by ELEKTA, can produce an electron beam with energies between 5 and 15 MeV in pulses of ~2 us with a substructure of 3 GHz. A tungsten target is used to produce up to 10^11 photons/s mm2 X-rays (bremsstrahlung) that are used for the treatment. The X-ray beam is contaminated with electrons produced by interaction with air. We characterized the beam using a fast detector sensitive to single photons and electrons. A permanent magnet was used to study the energy spectrum of the electrons directly produced by the LINAC and produced by the interactions with air, while a set of absorbers were used to simulate interactions in the human body.
        Speaker: Dr Nicola Minafra (The University of Kansas)
        Slides
    • 12:40 13:40
      Lunch break 1h
    • 13:40 15:45
      Beam Telescopes
      Convener: Jens Weingarten (Universitaet Goettingen)
      • 13:40
        Common beam telescopes, DAQ and reconstruction tool - evolution of EUDET-type telescopes and future plans 15m
        EUDET-type beam telescopes based on Mimosa26 sensors were developed in 2007. Ten years later, there a seven copies available for the R&D community at the DESYII, CERN PS/SPS and SLAC beam lines, which are frequently used mainly by HEP groups for future detector development, e.g. phase II at LHC or linear collider detectors. Within this user-driven evolution two software frameworks have been developed, which supports user groups for data taking and track reconstruction. Besides the current status, recent developments (including EUDAQ2) and a brief performance overview as a benchmark, this common infrastructure is evaluated. Many technical and organizational lessons were learned by the users as well as by the maintainers and local supporters at the beam lines. From this experience, it is valuable to think about what is needed for the future ten years out of the R&D community and which developments could be achieved in a joint effort, in order to have an easy accessible test environment for many different user demands as possible. This talk is an overview talk as well as an input for the JRA discussion during BTTB6.
        Speaker: Dr Jan Dreyling-Eschweiler (DESY)
        Slides
      • 13:55
        Progress of the AIDA-2020 Trigger Logic Unit (TLU) 15m
        The AIDA-2020 Trigger/Timing Logic Unit (TLU) is a piece of hardware that distributes signals to the detectors participating in a beam test. These signals allow the data from the different detectors corresponding to the same particle to be combined. The AIDA-2020 TLU is a development of TLUs designed for the AIDA and EUDET programmes. The original EUDET TLU was designed with only pixel beam telescopes operating at the DESY beam areas in mind. The AIDA-2020 TLU has been enhanced with respect to previous versions and is designed to interface to prototype Calorimeter detectors as well as being able to operate at the much higher particle flux available at, for example, the CERN beam test areas. The AIDA-2020 TLU in integrated with the EUDAQ2 DAQ framework. The current status of the AIDA-2020 TLU is presented, together with preliminary results from beam-tests where it has been used.
        Speaker: Dr David Cussans (University of Bristol)
        Slides
      • 14:10
        A Triggerless Readout System for Mimosa26 based Telescopes and A Python based test-beam analysis software 20m
        A compact readout-system based on a single FPGA-based readout board (MMC3) and Python software (pymosa) was developed. It supports configuring and readout of up to 6 Mimosa26 planes. Trigger-less and continuous data taking is implemented, allowing test beams with high particle rates (> 20 kHz). In order to analyse test beam data a platform independent Python package with graphical-user-interface was developed. The package called “testbeam_analysis” features plane alignment using all translation and rotation axes, Kalman filter based track fitting, and track building from time-reference and high resolution planes. In the talk, the readout-system is presented and challenges from a trigger-less Mimosa26 readout for track building are discussed. Additionally, the basic structure and analysis flow of “testbeam_analysis” is presented, as well as the performance based on measured residuals of a Mimosa26 telescope in a 2.5 GeV electron beam at the new test beam area in Bonn.
        Speaker: Mr Yannick Dieter (University of Bonn)
        Slides
      • 14:30
        Radiation length measurements for the ATLAS ITk Strip Detector 20m
        The ATLAS Phase-II Inner Tracker (ITk) Strip Detector is an upgrade for the current ATLAS tracking detector designed for the challenges of the high-luminosity LHC. A key point in the design stage of a tracking detector is to minimise the amount of material and therefore radiation lengths (X0) associated with the detector. As local support for the silicon strip sensors in the forward region (the end-caps) wedge-shaped structures called petals are foreseen. These petals are built dominantly out of light-weight carbon-fibre composite materials to address the tracker design goals. For such composite materials in the petal or new adhesives for gluing the sensors on the petal, only rough estimations of the radiation length can be calculated. To validate these estimations, which are taken into account in detector simulations, one can measure the radiation length directly in a testbeam experiment. In this case, electrons with energies between 1 and 5 GeV from the DESY testbeam traversing the inserted device will be scattered inside the material. The amount of scattering is dependent on the radiation lengths traversed. By using the provided EUDET-type beam telescopes it is possible to reconstruct the particle tracks with high positional and angular resolution and to evaluate the angular scattering distribution. The reconstruction is performed in EUTelescope using General Broken Lines (GBL) track fitting. Applying theoretical scattering models (e.g. Highland formula) allows the radiation length of the material to be extracted. One goal of these studies is to provide an infrastructure of X0 measurements for DESY testbeam users in the future by exploring now the details of this direct X0 measurement method. This talk will show the used X0 calibration targets as well as validation tests of the method. Moreover, dedicated measurements of ATLAS ITk specific materials will be presented.
        Speakers: Mr Jan-Hendrik Arling (DESY) , Ms Michaela Queitsch-Maitland (DESY)
        Slides
      • 14:50
        Track-based Multiple Scattering Tomography 20m
        Tomographic methods enable a three-dimensional imaging of complex structures and are widely used in medical applications but also for scientific use in numerous fields. We propose a new imaging method based on the tracking of charged particles in the GeV range traversing a sample under investigation. By measuring the distribution of the particles' deflection angles at the sample, an estimate on the projected material budget is extracted for a given 2D-cell in the sample. Illuminating the sample from various rotational angles allows for the 3D-reconstruction of the material budget via an inverse Radon transform. For the validation of the method, first measurements have been performed at the DESY Test Beam Facility, using a positron beam of several GeV and the DATURA Beam Telescope for high-precision particle tracking. The measurement was performed for homogeneous and inhomogeneous samples, providing calibration on the hand, and showing the feasibility and potential of this method on the other.
        Speaker: Mr Hendrik Jansen (DESY)
        Slides
      • 15:10
        Test beam results with Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (TowerJazz Investigator chip) at the SPS at CERN 20m
        Depleted monolithic active pixel sensors (DMAPS) in CMOS technology are being investigated for the outer layers of the ATLAS Inner Tracker (ITk) for the High Luminosity LHC starting in 2026. The advantage of monolithic sensors with respect to hybrid technology is that there is only a single die integrating the functionality of sensor and readout, reducing the budget material and potentially the power consumption per chip. Furthermore, it simplifies the production process and reduces the costs and production time - particularly important for the large area to be covered by the outer layers. The challenge of combining high-resistivity and full depletion of the sensitive layer, while ensuring radiation tolerance up to 10^15 neq/cm^2, is being addressed since few years by a collaboration of several institutes. Few demonstrator detectors with different CMOS technologies and also different front-end designs have been tested in terms of charge collection, radiation tolerance and rate capability. One of such prototypes is the TowerJazz investigator. It is a collection of multiple pixel mini-matrices, differing among each other by several parameters (cluster size/pitch, collection n-well size and spacing between n-well and deep p-well) allowing to study the optimal configuration in view of a final design. The chip has been tested in a beam of charged pions at the SPS at CERN, where it was installed on an ATLAS FE-I4 based telescopes. The latter consists of a six-planes system of IBL-like 150um planar pixel sensors (250x50um2 pitch) which are read out by the RCE DAQ system, with which a resolution of 8um is achieved. In this contribution, the results obtained in the 2017 test beam campaign are presented, with special emphasis on the comparison of different mini-matrices, and also between unirradiated and irradiated samples.
        Speakers: Enrico Junior Schioppa (CERN) , Florian Dachs (CERN) , Maria Moreno Llacer (CERN)
        Slides
      • 15:30
        The FEI4 UniGE Telescope and a year of data 15m
        In order to test detector prototypes, under study for the future vertex and track detectors, particle beam telescopes are widely used. The FEI4 telescope from Geneva University will be introduced together with its framework for data taking and remote control system. The telescope capabilities regarding timing measurement and achieved spatial resolution will also be shown. Multiple user cases and results will be shown together with the results from the latest HV-CMOS prototypes, such as the H35DEMO and the monolithic ATLASPix, under investigation by the group from Geneva University.
        Speaker: Mr Mateus Vicente (Universite de Geneve)
        Slides
    • 15:45 16:15
      Coffee break 30m
    • 16:15 18:05
      Beam Telescopes
      Convener: Dr Clara Nellist (Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen (DE))
      • 16:15
        Performance and integration studies with a large scale HV-MAPS prototype: 15m
        Precise tracking at high rates of low momentum particles requires novel pixel technologies. Monolithic approaches are good candidates to fulfill the requirements of precision experiments like Mu3e, as they have a very low radiation length. The newest member of the MuPix prototype family - which is developed in the context of Mu3e – is the 1x2 cm large MuPix8. It features a fully functional on-chip state machine, time-walk compensation circuits, 6bit charge measurement, on-chip zero suppression and 3+1 serial data links running at 1.25 Gbits/s. The time resolution of the MuPix8 is measured to be below 13 ns. Efficient test beam campaigns as well as integration studies are performed by building a four layer tracking telescope, which is the focus of this talk. The high rate capability of the MuPix8 in combination with the low material budget (chips can be thinned to 50 um) offer high performance at various facilities. The telescope system features on-FPGA time sorting, online efficiency estimation and monitoring. The MuPix and the telescope DAQ can handle 1 MHz track rate. Additional scintillating tiles deliver precise reference timing of 1 ns. Concept, realization and performance of the telescope will be addressed. In addition, results form MuPix8 testbeam campaigns will be presented.
        Speaker: Mr Lennart Huth (Physikalisches Institut Heidelberg)
        Slides
      • 16:30
        Highlights from the 2017 beam tests with the CLICdp Timepix3 telescope 20m
        The vertex- and tracking detectors at the proposed high-energy CLIC electron-positron collider will be based on small-pitch silicon pixel- or strip detectors. The requirements for these detectors include single-point position resolutions of a few microns combined with nanosecond time tagging of hits. Tests with particle beams are needed to assess the performance of existing and future prototype assemblies. To this end the CLIC detector and physics collaboration (CLICdp) operates a high-resolution beam telescope in the H6 beam line of the CERN SPS. It is based on Timepix3 hybrid pixel-detector assemblies with data-driven readout, allowing for track reconstruction at high particle rates (up to 10 million tracks / second) and with excellent spatial (<~2 microns) and temporal (<~1 ns) resolution. Several pixel detector prototypes with different readout architectures have been integrated into the telescope DAQ system and operated with high-energy hadron beams. We discuss performance results for the CLICdp reference telescope, the event building and reconstruction methods for various devices under test and show examples of ongoing data analyses.
        Speaker: Dr Andreas Nürnberg (CERN)
        Slides
      • 16:50
        LHCb Velo upgrade telescopes 15m
        The upgrade of the LHCb experiment will transform the experiment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at the LHC collision rate and up to $2\times 10^{33}cm^{−2} s^{-1}$ instantaneous luminosity. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon detector surrounding the interaction region. The upgraded VELO is based on a hybrid pixel system equipped with data driven electronics and designed to withstand a radiation dose up to 370 MRad or $8\times 10^{15} $ 1 MeV n$_{eq}$ $cm^{-2}$. The detector will be composed of silicon pixel sensors with 55 × 55 $\mu m ^2$ pitch, read out by the VeloPix ASIC which is being developed based on the TimePix/MediPix family. The VeloPix is capable of reading out up to 900 million hits per second. An additional challenge is the non uniform nature of the radiation damage, which results in requiring a guard ring design with excellent high voltage control. In addition, the n-in-p design requires the guard ring to be on the chip side making the high voltage reach the vicinity of the ground plane (about 30 $\mu$m apart). The performance of the prototype sensors has been investigated in a test beam in which a dedicated telescope system was created with two arms each equipped with 4 Timepix3 assemblies. The device to be tested can be mounted, rotated, and cooled in the central region, with a optional vacuum setup. This allows several different tests of the performance of the sensor prototypes before and after irradiation. The TimePix3 telescope is also used to study sensor prototypes for other LHCb upgrade sub detectors. In addition to VELO prototype sensors, the telescope has been used to study Upstream Tracker (UT), Scintillating Fibre (SciFi), Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH), Time-Of-Flight Ring Imaging CHerenkov (TORCH) and GasTpx3 prototypes. A few VeloPix Assemblies were used to create a telescope in order to check the synchronization of chips in a very high intensity beam environment, as well as investigate time-walk effects. The detectors were brought to the Fermilab beam facility where data were collected with highest possible particle rates. The preliminary results on the Velopix telescope data will be presented.
        Speaker: Dr Martin van Beuzekom (Nikhef)
        Slides
      • 17:05
        Modular telescope based on scintillating fibres coupled with low noise silicon photomultipliers 15m
        A modular telescope composed of four X/Y scintillating fibre tracking stations has been developed and employed to test the LHCb-SciFi 2.5m long modules. The fibres are read out by silicon photomultiplier arrays characterised by a low correlated noise, high photodetection efficiency and very good stability on a wide operational range. A single hit spatial resolution smaller than 40um was measured during the testbeam campaign performed this fall on secondary particle beam at the CERN North Area, with the resolution on the track at the position of the DUT estimated to be 16um. The hit efficiency was measured to be ~99%. Two main optimisation directions are being considered: to introduce timing measurement with time resolution of ~1ns, based on the fast signal coming from the SiPMs and limited only by the decay time of the fibre scintillator, and the possibility to increase the active surface allowing large area DUTs. This contribution will describe the results on the performances obtained with the current configuration and cover the main ongoing developments.
        Speaker: Mr Olivier Girard (EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland)
        Slides
      • 17:20
        Development of a large area strip telescope for the DESY II Testbeam Facility 15m
        As part of the AIDA2020 project, a new large area strip beam telescope is being developed. It has -in one direction- a point resolution of better than 10 µm and a comparably large area coverage of 10x20 cm². The telescope is designed such that it will be usable together with large volume DUTs inside the 1 T PCMAG solenoid at the DESY II Testbeam Facility. The design and the current development status will be presented.
        Speaker: mengqing Wu (DESY)
        Slides
      • 17:35
        A new CMS telescope for HL-LHC silicon detectors 15m
        For the High-Luminosity upgrade of the LHC the whole CMS Tracker Detector is scheduled to be replaced by a new system that can withstand a higher integrated radiation dose and can cope with a larger pile-up. Thus new tracker modules for both the inner and outer part of the detector are currently being designed and prototypes are being build. These have to be thoroughly tested at the expected high luminosity particle rates; for instance for PS Outer Tracker modules it is expected that they will see particles at 50 Mhz/cm2. Testing is done during beam tests where a dedicated telescope can provide reference tracks to match the hits found in the Detector Under Test. Currently there is no telescope available at CERN that can cope easily with these kind of particle rates and therefore it was decided to build a new high rate telescope within the CMS collaboration. It will be built using spares from the CMS Phase-1 Pixel upgrade. These can be operated easily with particle rates up to 200 Mhz/cm2 without significant data loss. During this talk the design of this new telescope will be discussed which is based on four planes on either side of the DUT consisting of two modules each. The active area of the planes will then be 64.8 x 16.2 x 2 mm2. By placing the modules close to the DUT the pointing resolution is expected to be better than 10 um. Lastly, as part of the design a custom version of the readout electronics will be produced for the telescope which will be part of the presentation as well.
        Speaker: Ms Nikkie Deelen (CERN)
        Slides
      • 17:50
        High Rate, High Resolution Beam Telescope to Investigate 3D pCVD Diamond Detectors 15m
        In order to investigate the general functionality and the rate behaviour of irradiated and non-irradiated diamond detectors a stand-alone modular beam telescope was developed at ETH Zurich based on CMS Pixel Chips. The talk is going to briefly describe the basic functionality of the full telescope and its individual hardware parts and focus attention on the recent upgrades. Many parts of the telescope were electronically upgraded and additional features added to increase the quality of the signals. The key upgrade of the telescope will include a mechanical setup which allows tilting of the planes in x and y direction to exploit the charge sharing between pixels. This will increase the tracking resolution required to probe 3D diamond detectors. A simulation of the resolution as well as some conclusive results will also be shown.
        Speaker: Mr Michael Reichmann (ETH Zuerich)
        Slides
    • 18:15 19:15
      Forum JRA Beam telescope 2025
      slides
    • 09:00 10:30
      Analysis: Scintillating Fibres & Calorimeters
      Convener: Dr Christopher Betancourt (University of Zurich)
      • 09:00
        Test beam results of the LHCb Scintillating Fibre Tracker 20m
        The Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker is designed to replace the current downstream tracking detectors in the LHCb Upgrade during 2019-20 (CERN/LHCC 2014-001; LHCb TDR 15). Collecting data at the increased luminosity foreseen for the upgrade will only be possible with front-end electronics read out at 40MHz and a flexible software-based triggering system that will increase the data rate as well as the events-of-interest efficiency . The SciFi Tracker is based on 2.5 metre long multi-layered ribbons from a total of 10000 km of 0.250 mm diameter scintillating fibre as the active medium and signal transport over 12 planes covering 350 m^2. Cooled silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays with 128 channels and 0.25 mm channel width are used as readout. The front-end electronics are designed to digitise the signals from the SiPMs with a custom ASIC chip, the PACIFIC, for the approximately 500k channels and reconstruct the track hit position within an on-board FPGA. The PACIFIC is a 64-channel chip with a fast 10~ns shaping time, dual 25 ns interleaved integrators, and provides binary signal-over-threshold information from three signal comparators per channel. This presentation will cover the test beam results and experiences from 2017 and earlier at the CERN SPS and DESY-2 facilities regarding the performance of the fibre tracker modules and the PACIFIC ASIC.
        Speaker: Dr Blake Dean Leverington (Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg)
        Slides
      • 09:20
        Testbeam Results for the Mu3e Scintillating Fibre Detector 20m
        With the enduring intensity increase of particle physics experiments at the precision frontier, high granularity timing detectors with excellent timing resolutions and very low additional material become crucial to control combinatorial backgrounds. Scintillating fibres combined to thin mats, read out with segmented silicon photomultipliers provide sub-nanosecond timing resolutions with material budget below 0.5% X_0 and spatial resolution in the order of 250µm. For the mu3e scintillating fibre detector different scintillating fibre types, including novel Nanostructured Organosilicon Luminophores (NOL) fibres, in different mat configuration were tested. The main focus of this talk is to summarize the findings obtained during testbeams. Furthermore first experiences with the dedicate SiPM readout ASIC MuTRiG (STiC successor) are presented.
        Speaker: Mr Lukas Gerritzen (ETH Zurich, IPA)
        Slides
      • 09:40
        Prototype tests for a highly granular scintillator-based hadron calorimeter 20m
        Within the CALICE collaboration, several concepts for the hadronic calorimeter of a future linear collider detector are studied. After having demonstrated the capabilities of the measurement methods in "physics prototypes", the focus now lies on improving their implementation in "engineering prototypes", that are scalable to the full linear collider detector. The Analog Hadron Calorimeter (AHCAL) concept is a sampling calorimeter of tungsten or steel absorber plates and plastic scintillator tiles read out by silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) as active material. The front-end chips are integrated into the active layers of the calorimeter and are designed for minimal power consumption (power pulsing). The versatile electronics allows the prototype to be equipped with different types of scintillator tiles and SiPMs. Prototypes in various configurations with up to ~3700 channels, equipped with several types of scintillator tiles and SiPMs, were exposed to electron, muon and hadron beams. The experience of these beam tests as well as the availability of new generation SiPMs with much reduced noise and better device-to-device uniformity resulted in an improved detector design with surface-mount SiPMs allowing for easier mass assembly.
        Speaker: Marisol Robles Manzano (JGU Mainz)
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Test Beam Studies for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Upgrade Readout Electronics 15m
        The High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider is expected to deliver 3-4/ab of p-p collisions with around 200 collisions per proton bunch crossing starting in 2026, and the readout electronics of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter need to be upgraded to deal with the high rate of data taking as well as the large pileup conditions. The proposed digitizer/shaper cards were tested in 2016-7 in the North Area at CERN using the beam from the SPS to produce high energy pions, electrons, muons, and kaons. This presentation summarizes the setup for particle identification and study of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter data taking in preparation for the production of main boards and digitizer/shaper boards for the photo-multiplier tubes. The fully assembled and tested mini-drawers will start to be installed after the LHC long shutdown in December 2023. The pulse shape, uniformity, and timing precision of the upgrade system are demonstrated.
        Speaker: Douglas Schaefer (CERN)
        Slides
      • 10:15
        Studies of the ATLAS hadronic Calorimeter response to different particles at Test Beams 15m
        The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Phase II upgrade aims to increase the accelerator luminosity by a factor of 5-10. Due to the expected higher radiation levels and the aging of the current electronics, a new readout system of the ATLAS experiment hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) is needed. A prototype of the upgrade TileCal electronics has been tested using the beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) accelerator at CERN. Data were collected with beams of muons, electrons and hadrons at various incident energies and impact angles. The muons data allow to study the dependence of the response on the incident point and angle in the cell. The electron data are used to determine the linearity of the electron energy measurement. The hadron data will allow to tune the calorimeter response to pions and kaons modelling to improve the reconstruction of the jet energies. The results of the ongoing data analysis are discussed in the presentation.
        Speaker: Ms Tamar Zakareishvili (High Energy Physics Institute of Tbilisi State University)
        Slides
    • 10:30 11:00
      Coffee break 30m
    • 11:00 12:00
      Software & Simulation
      Convener: Dr Jan Dreyling-Eschweiler (DESY)
      • 11:00
        Allpix Squared - A Generic Pixel Detector Simulation Framework 15m
        Allpix Squared is a generic open-source simulation framework for pixel detectors. Its goal is to ease the implementation of detailed simulations for both single detectors and more complex setups such as beam telescopes. Predefined detector types can be automatically constructed from simple model files describing the detector parameters. The simulation chain is arranged with the help of intuitive configuration files and an extensible system of modules, which implement the separate simulation steps. Currently available modules include realistic charge carrier deposition using the Geant4 toolkit, propagation of charge carriers in silicon either using a drift-diffusion model or a projection onto the sensor implants, and a simulation of the detector front-end electronics including noise, threshold, and digitization. Detailed electric field maps imported from TCAD simulations can be used to precisely model the drift behavior of the charge carriers, bringing a new level of realism to the simulation of particle detectors. The history of every simulated object, including the Monte Carlo truth information of the original ionizing radiation, is preserved and can be stored to file, allowing for a direct comparison with reconstructed position information. The framework is written in modern C++ and comes with fully documented source code as well as an extensive user manual. Its modular approach allows for a flexible set-up of the simulation and facilitates the reuse of independent, well-tested algorithms. This contribution provides an overview of the framework and its different simulation modules, and presents first comparisons with test beam data.
        Speaker: Dr Simon Spannagel (CERN)
        Slides
      • 11:15
        DQM4HEP : a generic data quality monitoring framework for HEP 15m
        Data quality monitoring is the first step to the certification of the recorded data for off-line physics analysis. Dedicated monitoring framework have been developed by many experiments in the last decades and usually rely on the event data model (EDM) of the experiment, leading to a strong dependency on the data format and storage. We present a generic data quality monitoring system, DQM4HEP, that has been developed without any assumption on the EDM. This increases the code maintenance, the portability across different experiments and re-usability for future experiment. After introducing the framework architecture and the various tools provided by the software package, its use in different testbeam situations for various detectors, such as the SDHCal, SiWECal, AHCal calorimeters of the CALICE collaboration, is presented. The ongoing developments on data quality assessment in off-line mode and future integrations for different projects are finally discussed.
        Speaker: Dr Remi Ete (DESY)
        Transparents
      • 11:30
        Environmental slow control system for the DESY II Testbeam Area 15m
        As an ‘upgrade of beam and irradiataion test infrastucture’ within the EU AIDA2020 project, an environmental control system has been built at DESY. This system serves as a central monitoring system to log the environmental paratmers of the detector and the whole experimental area at DESY testbeam. It consists of a set of sensors and software to readout the collected data at the test beam. It is designed to be integrated into the slow control ssytem of all test beam user groups, and provides them with a ready-to-use and reliable logging system centrally maintained and supported by DESY.
        Speaker: Dr Mengqing WU (DESY)
        Slides
      • 11:45
        The Proteus beam telescope reconstruction package 15m
        Beam telescopes are one of the key tools to investigate novel sensor prototypes. Successful measurement campaigns rely on fast and user-friendly reconstruction to produce relevant results in a timely fashion. The Proteus software is the reconstruction package used for the Geneva FE-I4 telescope. It supports streamlined event processing, support for complex sensors with multiple sub-matrices, and robust alignment procedures. Recently, we added support for additional input data formats and extended track fitting algorithms. This talk will introduce the software design and discuss its basic structure and functionality. Performance examples using simulations and data from the Geneva FEI-4 telescope will be shown.
        Speaker: Dr Moritz Kiehn (Université de Genève)
        Slides
    • 12:00 13:00
      Lunch break 1h
    • 13:00 14:45
      Tutorials
      • 13:00
        Hands-On: Making the most of your 10 minutes of fame 1h 45m ETH HG E 33.1

        ETH HG E 33.1

        Zurich, Switzerland

        Rämistrasse 101, 8092 Zürich, Schweiz
        Presentations in working meetings and conferences are the culmination of weeks or months of work and are one of our most important communication methods to our peers. Yet the 10-15 minutes they take are often seen as tedious and boring, both by the audience and even the presenter! We will identify, as a group, some simple but effective methods of improving presentations and posters with hands-on activities to reinforce concepts. Instructions to participants: bring your own laptops and be prepared to share your work with fellow participants! You should have Powerpoint installed, or something that can open and edit Powerpoint files.
        Speaker: Dr David Barney (CERN)
        Slides
      • 13:00
        Hands-On: Scattering Images using EUTelescope 1h 45m ETH HG E 33.3

        ETH HG E 33.3

        Zurich, Switzerland

        Rämistrasse 101, 8092 Zürich, Schweiz
        EUTelescope is a Generic Pixel Telescope Data Analysis Framework. It has started developing mainly using EUDET-type beam telescopes, but user-driven developments have extended the framework, as for example the General Broken Line (GBL) track finding. This tutorial provides a short overview on EUTelescope and is focusing on going through the analysis flow to get a scattering image. Scattering images allows to characterize the material budget of detector components for example. An example dataset is provided. References of EUTelescope: http://eutelescope.web.cern.ch/
        Speaker: Michaela Queitsch-Maitland (DESY)
        Slides
      • 13:00
        Hands-On: The Proteus Reconstruction Software 1h 45m ETH HG E 33.5

        ETH HG E 33.5

        Zurich, Switzerland

        Rämistrasse 101, 8092 Zürich, Schweiz
        Proteus is a software to reconstruct and analyze data from beam telescopes. In this tutorial we will follow an analysis from raw hit data to reconstructed tracks and basic efficiency measurements using an example dataset. The software requires ROOT and a C++11 compatible compiler. Participants are encouraged to install it on their local computer or on CERN lxplus machines by following the instructions provided on the project page here: https://gitlab.cern.ch/unige-fei4tel/proteus
        Speaker: Dr Moritz Kiehn (Université de Genève)
        Slides
    • 14:45 15:15
      Coffee break 30m
    • 15:15 17:00
      Tutorials
      • 15:15
        Hands-On: Measurement of time of arrival 1h 45m ETH HG E 33.5

        ETH HG E 33.5

        Comparison between different algorithms to compute the arrival time using sampled signals. Starting from a simple threshold crossing, the time precision can be improved implementing a smarter discriminator (hysteresis, peak selection, interpolation, ... ) and time walk corrections (Constant Fraction, ... ) Real data acquired in a beam test will be used. Prerequisites: laptop, C++ knowledge, root
        Speaker: Mr Nicola Minafra (CERN)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Hands-On: The Allpix Squared Simulation Framework 1h 45m ETH HG E 33.1

        ETH HG E 33.1

        Scope ----- This tutorial will give an introduction to the Allpix Squared simulation framework. We will walk through the examples provided with the framework and set up our own telescope-plus-DUT simulation with different configuration options. In addition, the tutorial will serve as AMA (ask-me-anything) for the framework. Preparation ----------- Please install the latest version of Allpix Squared (v1.1.0) on your computer or make sure you have access to a working version online before attending the tutorial. Detailed instructions can be found in the manual or on the website ([https://cern.ch/allpix-squared][1]) There are three options: 1. Install Allpix Squared locally, with local ROOT and Geant4 versions - please follow the installation instructions in the user manual 2. Install Allpix Squared locally or on LXPLUS, while using CVMFS versions of ROOT and Geant4 - this works only for SLC6 and CentOS7 systems - install the CERN CVMFS daemon and source appropriate ROOT and Geant4 versions using their .sh-scripts. Then compile Allpix Squared. 3. Use Allpix Squared on LXPLUS using the centrally provided version on CVMFS. For this, you only need to source the appropriate script and you are ready to go: ### For CERN CentOS7: source /cvmfs/clicdp.cern.ch/software/allpix-squared/1.1.0/x86_64-centos7-gcc7-opt/setup.sh ### For CERN Scientific Linux 6: source /cvmfs/clicdp.cern.ch/software/allpix-squared/1.1.0/x86_64-slc6-gcc7-opt/setup.sh **For all options including dependencies from CVMFS:** It might take a while until the CVMFS cache is populated with the necessary libraries when starting the program for the first time. [1]: https://cern.ch/allpix-squared
        Speaker: Dr Simon Spannagel (CERN)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Hands-On: The MIDAS data acquisition system for Test Beams 1h 45m ETH HG E 33.3

        ETH HG E 33.3

        The Maximum Integrated Data Acquisition System (MIDAS) has been used in many test beam experiments over the last years. It has been developed in a collaboration between PSI, Switzerland and TRIUMF, Canada, and is constantly updated and extended after its initial revision more than 20 years ago. This tutorial gives a basic overview of the MIDAS components and concepts and their application to test beams. It covers event-based data acquisition, slow control of beam lines and other experiment components, data visualization and its web-based user interface. Various short demonstrations show various MIDAS components and example programs.
        Speaker: Stefan Ritt (PSI)
        Flyer and installation instructions
    • 17:30 19:30
      "Stories of the Old Town" City Tour 2h
    • 20:00 22:30
      Workshop dinner: Fondue at restaurant "Altes Kloesterli" 2h 30m
    • 09:00 10:40
      Analysis: Gas & Silicon Strip Detectors
      Convener: Dr Hendrik Jansen (DESY)
      • 09:00
        Test beam results of planar GEMs with analog and time readout in strong magnetic field and very high rate 20m
        Particle detection is one of the pillars of the research in fundamental physics. Since several years, a new concept of detectors, called Micro Pattern Gas Detectors (MPGD), allows to overcome many of limits the preexistent detectors, like drift chambers and microstrip detectors, reducing the discharge rate and increasing the radiation tolerance. Among these, one of the most commonly used is the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM). GEMs have become an important reality for fundamental physics detectors. Commonly deployed as fast timing detectors and triggers, due to their fast response, high rate capability and high radiation hardness, they can also be used as trackers. A series of test beam has been performed in order to characterize the behavior of 10x10 cm2 triple-GEMs and to assess the spatial resolution performance with analog readout with and without magnetic field at H4 line in CERN North Area. The presence of a strong magnetic field distorts the avalanche propagation in the gas and thus the conventional charge centroid readout performance is limited to more than 400 µm. To overcome this limit, a new readout technique based on the time of the arrival of the inducted signal on the strip was developed: since it uses a concept similar to the one of the Time Projection Chambers, but the drift gas is only few millimiters, this readout technique is called u-TPC. This new technique uses the information of time of arrival and drift velocity to extract the position. The high rate increases the number of ions inside the gaps that can eventually distort the drift fields and thus the drift velocity. To test up to which rate the uTPC readout holds, a further test beam was performed at Mainzer Microtron (MAMI), in Mainz. In this contribution, the results of the two different test beam will be presented with a particular focus on the uTPC readout results in magnetic field and on the high rate test in Mainz.
        Speaker: Mr Riccardo Farinelli (INFN Ferrara)
        Slides
      • 09:20
        Low material budget beam monitoring with optically read out GEMs 20m
        Optically read out Gaseous Electron Multipliers (GEMs) are well suited for online monitoring of particle beams in high energy physics as well as medical fields. The high gain factors achievable by GEMs and the good spatial resolution enabled by state-of-the-art CCD or CMOS imaging sensors permit accurate beam profile and position monitoring over a wide range of beam energies, particle fluxes and for different types of beams. The low material budget achievable with optically read out gaseous detectors minimises the impact on traversing beams and makes them well suited for online monitoring applications. Furthermore, direct visualisations of beams can be obtained from imaging sensors without the need for extensive image reconstruction algorithms. This enables online beam monitoring with refreshing rates of tens of Hz limited by the frame rates achievable by employed imaging sensors. Test beam results of optically read out GEM-based detectors in muon and pion beams at the SPS test beam facility at CERN are presented and integrated beam profile images as well as temporally resolved imaging capabilities are shown. In addition, an optically read out low material budget detector was operated in proton pencil beams at a hadron therapy clinic and the applicability of the presented concept for beam monitoring and characterisation in proton therapy is investigated.
        Speaker: Mr Florian Brunbauer (Technische Universität Wien, CERN)
        Slides
      • 09:40
        Hit, track and vertex reconstruction using multiplexed micromegas detectors in NA64 20m
        The NA64 experiment is a fixed target experiment at the SPS at CERN, searching for new physics using an active beam dump to detect missing-energy events. It employs a tracker based on multiplexed micromegas detectors, which presents a unique challenge with respect to reconstructing particle trajectories. In particular, the signature of dark photon (or alternatively $^8$Be anomaly X boson) decay to e$^+$e$^-$ pair requires the reconstruction of the decay vertex \textit{after} the beam dump calorimeter, where owing to a lack of hermiticity, additional particles may also be present. This talk reports on the progress towards reconstructing such events, using simulation and a test data set from NA64 2017 run comprising dimuon events (which have a similar experimental signature).
        Speaker: Dr David Cooke (ETH Zurich)
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Test beam results of prototype modules for the ATLAS ITk Strip detector 20m
        During the High-Luminosity phase of the LHC the luminosity will be almost five times larger than the present LHC luminosity, corresponding to approximately 200 inelastic proton-proton interactions per beam crossing, while the total integrated luminosity will exceed 3000 fb^-1. In order to cope with the higher radiation level and the higher pile-up, the ATLAS experiment will need a complete replacement of the current tracking system with an all silicon detector, the Inner Tracker (ITk). For this reason, new radiation-hard sensors and front-end chips will be used and are now under development. With the pre-production phase expected in 2018-2019 and the module production expected to start in 2020, a full understanding of the current prototype modules is essential. This talk presents the results of the tests of a prototype barrel module and of the first prototype end-cap module. The measurements were performed at the DESY test beam facility and the track reconstruction was done using the EUTelescope framework. Significant modifications to EUTelescope have been made to handle the radial geometry of the strips of the end-cap module. The main focus of the analysis lies in the study of the efficiency, charge collection and cluster size in different regions of the modules. The obtained results show a good agreement with previous test beam data as well as with the simulations, and give confidence that the ITk strip detector will perform well for the full duration of the HL-LHC.
        Speaker: Mr Edoardo Rossi (DESY)
        Slides
      • 10:20
        Beam test measurements with a new read-out system for the future CMS Phase-II outer tracker 20m
        For the high-luminosity upgrade of the CMS outer tracker, a new, MicroTCA-based read-out system is envisaged. In a recent beam test at DESY, the functionality of a prototype version of this system and its firmware was demonstrated. This contribution shows beam test results and comparisons to simulations.
        Speaker: Dr Thomas Eichhorn (DESY)
        Slides
    • 10:40 11:10
      Coffee break 30m
    • 11:10 13:00
      Analysis: Silicon Pixel Detectors
      Convener: Dr Simon Spannagel (CERN)
      • 11:10
        Characterization of prototypes for the CMS Phase II pixel sensors 20m
        For the HL- LHC the irradiation level that the detectors will have to withstand will be reaching a 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence of 2×10^16neq/cm2 and a total ionizing dose of 10 MGy at the location where the sensors of the Inner Tracker will be installed. The upgraded Phase-2 Inner Tracker is designed to maintain or improve the tracking and vertexing capabilities under these high pileup and radiation conditions. Various pixel sensor designs have been fabricated and bump bonded to ROC4Sens read-out chips and are evaluated for radiation hardness, spatial resolution and charge collection efficiency as well as pixel hit efficiency using the DESY test beam facilities. The shallow angle method is used to measure the depletion depth and possibly trapping effects due to irradiation as the track passes the pixel cells in varying depths. The edge-on method allows for in-silicon tracking and thus to obtain the intrinsic position resolution of the silicon sensors without using an external reference tracking detector. The results of these measurement methods on the new pixel sensor designs will be presented.
        Speaker: Ms Caroline Niemeyer (University of Hamburg)
        Slides
      • 11:30
        Test Beam Results of Sensors with Modified Pixel Implantations 20m
        In phase II the LHC will be upgraded to the High Luminosity LHC. To fulfill the increased particle flux and higher instant luminosity, the ATLAS experiment will be equipped with a new Inner Tracker (ITk). Because of the close position to the beam line, the pixel modules of the ITk are exposed to high radiation. Planar n-in-n silicon sensors with different pixel implantations have been designed and prototype sensors have been irradiated in test facilities to simulate the radiation damage. The track recognition efficiency of the different pixel designs are studied by analyzing test beam data. For this analysis the software framework TBMon2 is used. A new analysis extention ''EfficiencyVsGeometry'' was developed to receive detailed results for different parts of the sensor. In this talk the results of non-irradiated sensors and irradiated sensors with either protons or neutrons are presented.
        Speaker: Mareike Weers (TU Dortmund)
        Slides
      • 11:50
        Compilation of the results on test beam characterization of ADVACAM 50 um-thick edgeless sensors 20m
        The work is devoted to the study of the test beam performance of active and slim edge ATLAS planar pixel sensors (PPS) in various test conditions including irradiation fluences (1e15 and 2e15 neq/cm^2) and sensor inclination. CERN and DESY beam facilities have been used for the test beam performing.
        Speaker: Mr Dmytro Hohov (LAL Université Paris-Sud)
        Slides
      • 12:10
        Radiation hardness of 3D pixel sensors up to unprecedented fluences of 3e16 neq/cm² 20m
        3D silicon detectors, with cylindrical electrodes that penetrate the sensor bulk perpendicularly to the surface, present a radiation-hard sensor technology. Due to a reduced electrode distance, trapping at radiation-induced defects is less and the operational voltage and power dissipation after heavy irradiation are significantly lower than for planar devices. During the last years, the 3D technology has matured and 3D pixel detectors are already used in high-energy physics particle detectors where superior radiation hardness is key: in the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) and the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector. For the High-Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), the radiation-hardness requirements are even more demanding with expected fluences up to 2.5$\times10^{16} n_{eq}$/cm$^2$ for the innermost pixel layer of the ATLAS and CMS experiments after an integrated luminosity of 4,000 fb$^{-1}$. The baseline scenario foresees a replacement after half of the life time. Moreover, to face the foreseen large particle multiplicities, smaller pixel sizes of 50$\times$50 or 25$\times$100 $\mu$m$^{2}$ are planned. In the context of this work, a new generation of CNM 3D pixel sensors with small pixel sizes of 50x50 and 25x100 $\mu$m$^{2}$ and reduced electrode distances are developed for the HL-LHC upgrade of the ATLAS pixel detector. For the first time, pixel detectors are irradiated and studied up to the unprecedented fluence of 3$\times10^{16} n_{eq}$/cm$^2$, i.e. beyond the full expected HL-LHC life time to explore the limits of the 3D technology. Since a readout chip with the desired pixel size is still under development by the RD53 collaboration, first prototype small-pitch pixel sensors were designed to be matched to the existing ATLAS IBL FE-I4 readout chip for testing. Irradiation campaigns with such pixel devices have been carried out at KIT (Karlsruhe) with a uniform irradiation of 23 MeV protons up to a fluence of 1$\times10^{16} n_{eq}$/cm$^2$, as well as at CERN-PS with a non-uniform irradiation of 23 GeV protons in several steps up to a peak fluence of 3$\times10^{16} n_{eq}$/cm$^2$. The hit efficiency has been measured in several beam tests at the CERN-SPS. The performance of these devices is significantly better than for the previous generation of 3D detectors or the current generation of planar silicon pixel detectors, demonstrating the excellent radiation hardness of the new 3D technology.
        Speaker: Mr Joern Lange (IFAE Barcelona)
        Slides
      • 12:30
        Single-layer track reconstruction using drift-time 20m
        A precise measurement of the arrival time distribution of ionisation charges in a reverse-biased single silicon pixel sensor layer can be used to determine the impact point, incident angle and direction of minimum ionising particles. This concept of a Silicon Time-Projection-Chamber could for example be used to reduce the number of sensor layers in large-area tracking detectors, or to improve the track-prediction resolution of beam telescopes with inclined sensor planes. First tests of the concept have been performed using sensors of different thicknesses with 55 micron pitch and Timepix3 readout in a 120 GeV hadron beam at the CERN SPS. The fine binning of 1.56 ns for the Timepix3 arrival time measurement allows for a precise determination of the depth of charge deposition in each pixel. This information is used in a multi-variate analysis in combination with the charge measurement and cluster shape, in order to reconstruct the track impact point, incident angle and direction. The CLICdp Timepix3 beam telescope in the H6 beam line of the SPS is used as a reference detector to predict the track position and incident angle on the device under test (DUT). In this contribution we introduce the multi-variate track reconstruction method for the DUT and present results for different sensor thicknesses and various track incident angles.
        Speaker: Ms Morag Williams (University of Glasgow / CERN)
        Slides
    • 13:00 13:30
      Closing session
      slides